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This blog offers you comments on recent events written by members of D+C’s editorial team. You’ll find one or two posts per week. The guiding question is whether something is good or bad for global development.

by Hans Dembowski

What the Jasmine revolution means for the MENA region

The Arab spring has mostly turned into a nightmare – with the exception of Tunisia, where the protests first erupted seven years ago. Within a few weeks, the popular uprising toppled autocratic President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. His downfall triggered protests in many other countries. In Egypt, Libya and Yemen strongmen lost power soon, and Bahrain’s monarchy only survived thanks to a Saudi intervention. In Syria, the devastating civil war began.
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by Hans Dembowski

In praise of taxes

The Paradise Papers and US President Donald Trump’s tax reform plans have generated lots of headlines internationally in recent weeks. Taxes are also high on the agenda of the negotiations that are meant to forge a new coalition government in Germany. All over the world, some commentators pretend that taxes are something evil, and that taxpayers are always overburdened. The idea that cutting taxes is always good is closely related to the idea that markets are always superior to state action.
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by Hans Dembowski

Climate change and the decline of the Roman Empire

Scholars’ understanding of history is changing as they increasingly consider environmental dimensions. Before the 1970s, hardly anyone worried about ecological issues, so historians did not pay attention to related topics. Today, however, the interest in climate change has grown dramatically, and it is increasingly understood that climate volatility had a huge impact on social and political life throughout the centuries.
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by Hans Dembowski

Kenya’s Supreme Court is unable to act at time of crisis

Kenya’s Supreme Court resumed responsibility in an irresponsible way, when it annulled the country’s presidential election in September. Voters will go to the polls tomorrow in an utterly confusing scenario. The rerun election is not a real election, because opposition leader Raila Odinga has told his supporters to boycott the event. Making matters worse, some may try to disrupt the election.
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