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This blog offers you comments on recent events written by members of D+C’s editorial team. You’ll find one or two posts per week. The guiding question is whether something is good or bad for global development.

More pressure is likely to make Iran’s regime more reckless

German media are currently discussing whether our country’s navy should support a European military mission in the Arab Gulf region. Shortly before Theresa May was replaced by Boris Johnson as British prime minister last week, her government proposed such a mission. The idea is to form a coalition of the willing that might protect ships from Iranian aggression.
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Keeping women down

Despite some obvious advances regarding women and power – having female politicians, for example –, there are many setbacks in the fight for equal rights for all sexes. One of the ways to keep women from power is the exertion of psychological and physical violence against them, sometimes leading to their death.
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Ending the taboo

For too many girls in developing countries the beginning of their menstrual cycle is the end of their education – and their dreams. “Period. End of Sentence.” is an example of how women can be empowered through discussing, educating about and addressing the problems that can accompany menstruation.
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Europe on the wrong track

The EU’s stance on migration has taken on a new negative dimension. Again and again, refugees from African countries are stuck for days or weeks in rescue ships off the European coast. European countries, in particular Italy, refuse rescue ships access to their ports.
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The tide may be turning in Turkey

On Sunday, Ekrem Imamoglu won Istanbul's mayoral re-run election in a landslide. The right-wing populists of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s party, the AKP, have lost their aura of invincibility. Even in a troubled democracy, voters' choice can still make a difference.
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Xi Jinping is weaker than many observers believe

Two weeks weeks ago, my blog post spelled out in what senses China has opened up after (and in spite of) the bloodshed on Tiananmen Square in 1989. Now I’d like to discuss what it means that this trend seems to have gone into reverse some years ago and what difference the global scenario makes.
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When border-security forces are a cause of flight

On 3 June, Sudan’s security forces started clamping down on pro-democracy protests. Many dozens of people were killed. The paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) are reported to have acted with particular brutality. For several reasons, western countries’ response has been unimpressive.
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Sudan is not China

The reasons of China’s developmental success are largely misunderstood by western media. Yes, an authoritarian government made it happen, but it was different from most authoritarian governments. Leaders did not simply exploit the country, but focused on development. At first glance, the way Sudanese troops have been crushing protests last week looks a lot like what happened 30 years earlier in China – but it is very unlikely that the generals there will take a similar developmental approach.
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